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Coshnet's Blog

COSH Groups Help Teens Confront Workplace Violence; Shocking Statistics Lead to Remarkable Partnerships

On Monday, June 23rd, Dr. David Michaels, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health,  joined four teen peer educators in a telephone press conference to kick off Teens Lead at Work for 2014.  The program, originated by Massachusetts Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (MassCOSH) in 2002, is now a national effort to help young workers recognize – and avoid – the hazards of workplace violence.

Contractor Death Highlights Responsibility Issues

On May 19th, 59-year-old construction worker Okesene Faasalele was working to demolish a railroad bridge spanning California’s 91 Freeway. The section of the bridge he was harnessd to buckled, swinging him to the highway lanes below. Struck by metal debris, Faasalele did not survive the fall.

Workers Memorial Week 2014: Highlights of Events from Coast to Coast

Around the world last week, people came together to observe Workers’ Memorial Week (WMW) with vigils, ceremonies, marches, meals, and music. Tales of loss and remembrance echoed from community to community – along with a renewed dedication to action.

National COSH on CNN en Español

CNN en Español host Juan Carlos Lopez interviewed National COSH Deputy Director Jessica Martinez on April 24th on the occasion of Workers' Memorial Week and the release of the new National COSH report Preventable Deaths 2014: The Tragedy of Workplace Fatalities.

Spanish transcript below.

English Transcript:

LOCAL COSH GROUPS RELEASE REPORTS FOR WORKERS’ MEMORIAL WEEK

In addition to National COSH's report of Preventable Deaths, local COSH groups – in New York, California, Massachusetts, Wyoming, Tennessee, and Texas – have written state-specific reports.

National COSH releases "Preventable Deaths 2014: The Tragedy of Workplace Fatalities"

For Workers' Memorial Week, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health has released its annual report on preventable deaths in the U.S. workplace. More than 50,000 U.S. workers die each year due to occupational injuries and illnesses, according to the report.

Editorial boards come out against USDA's proposed poultry rule

If local and regional newspapers had their say in it, the USDA would rethink its proposed poultry rule, which would drastically increase the inspection line speeds at poultry factories and would replace government inspectors with company-appointed ones.

In the past couple of weeks, the folly of the proposed rule has been opined about in editorial pages in newspapers from the most affected regions.

In latest appropriations bill, Congress favors politics over safety in grain facilities

Grain_bins_Flickr_Photo_By_Toby_d1The hazards associated with grain bin storage and other “post-harvest” activities are well documented, and 2010 saw a record number of grain bin fatalities, with 26 workers perishing in these facilities.

Secret provision tucked into Farm Bill would grind rulemaking to a halt. Because science.

When the American Association for the Advancement of Science comes out against a proposal called the “Sound Science Act,” it’s time to pay attention.

But, you see, the “Sound Science Act,” tucked ever so quietly in the must-pass, House-approved Farm Bill, would essentially bring all pending regulatory actions to a grinding halt – all in the name of science. In short, it would choke public protections through “paralysis by analysis.”

Press Release: Lessons Unlearned: Too Many Similarities Between West Virginia Chemical Spill and West, Texas, Disaster

Lessons Unlearned: Too Many Similarities Between West Virginia Chemical Spill and West, Texas, Disaster

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